FREE EVALUATION
Are you receiving Social Security benefits?*
Has applicant been, or expect to be, out of full-time work for at least 12 months (earning under $980 in payroll checks per month)?*
Have you retained an attorney for your social security claim?*

Important Facts

  • What if I can't afford the medical care to get the medical documentation that I need for the social security administration? Usually there are other providers in the community that offer care at a reduced price or free...
    Important Fact
  • What if I can't afford the medical care to get the medical documentation that I need for the social security administration? Usually there are other providers in the community that offer care at a reduced price or free...
    Important Fact 2
  • Do I have to wait 1 year to apply for SSI/SSDI? No you should apply as soon as you become disabled if your condition is expected to last 1 year or more or it is expected to result in death...
    Important Fact 4
  • I missed the 60 day appeal deadline, do I have to start all over again? Not necessarily, if you can show that you had a good reason for missing your appeal deadline, such as being hospitalized...
    Important Fact 3
  • Do I have to wait 1 year to apply for SSI/SSDI? No you should apply as soon as you become disabled if your condition is expected to last 1 year or more or it is expected to result in death. ...
    Important Fact
  • What if I can't afford the medical care to get the medical documentation that I need for the social security administration? Usually there are other providers in the community that offer care at a reduced price or free...
    Important Fact

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a program that offers a source of income to blind or disabled adults over the age of 65 and above whose existing income is low.

The SSI program is managed by the Social Security Administration; however the SSA does not pay for this program.  The U.S. Treasury General funds bear the cost of Supplemental Security income.

You can apply for SSI and get monthly payments if you are 65 years of age or above, blind or disabled, and your income is low and you do not have many resources (things you own).

Your income and resources

Income here refers to the money received as compensation for work done — wages.  It includes social security benefits, pensions, food and shelter.  Your location influences the SSI that you may be eligible for.  You may qualify for SSI with a certain income in one place while the same income may be judged as sufficient for another location.

Income

Social security excludes the following when computing your income for SSI qualification:

  •     The first $20 each month from the different sources of income available to you.
  •     The first $65 earned each month and half the amount over $65.
  •      SNAP benefits.
  •      Shelter extended by non-profit organizations.
  •       Home energy assistance.

For married people, a part of the spouse’s income and resources are considered when assessing eligibility for SSI.  For applications under 18 years of age, parental incomes and resources are considered.  The income and resources of sponsors are taken into account for sponsored non-citizens.

For students, not all wages and scholarships are considered for SSI eligibility.

Items and services that help disabled people to work are not counted by Social Security.  To illustrate, money that you use to buy a pair of crutches or a wheelchair to help you with work will not be counted toward SSI eligibility.

Any portion of a wage that a blind person uses for work purposes is exempt from consideration.  For example, money spent by a blind person to travel to and from the work place will not be considered as income.

SSI will exclude a part of the income saved by blind and disabled applicants for the purpose of training and purchasing things necessary for work.

Resources, or things that you own, include property, bank accounts, cash, stocks, and bonds.  These are taken into consideration when assessing an applicant’s eligibility for SSI.

Individuals with resources amounting to less than $2,000 may qualify for SSI.  For couples, this figure is $3,000.  Property owners trying to sell property may qualify for SSI while in the process of selling the property.

As mentioned above, not everything you own is considered in deciding your eligibility toward SSI.  Your house and the property on which it stands, life insurance policies with a face value of $1,500 and less, your car, burial plots, and a maximum of $1,500 in burial funds for you and the same amount for your spouse are some of the resources that do not count against you when considering eligibility.

While in some situations, even non-citizen residents in the U.S. can qualify for SSI, as a rule of thumb you must be a U.S. citizen living in the United States or the Northern Mariana islands.