FREE EVALUATION
Are you receiving Social Security benefits?*
Has applicant been, or expect to be, out of full-time work for at least 12 months (earning under $980 in payroll checks per month)?*
Have you retained an attorney for your social security claim?*

Important Facts

  • What if I can't afford the medical care to get the medical documentation that I need for the social security administration? Usually there are other providers in the community that offer care at a reduced price or free...
    Important Fact
  • What if I can't afford the medical care to get the medical documentation that I need for the social security administration? Usually there are other providers in the community that offer care at a reduced price or free...
    Important Fact 2
  • Do I have to wait 1 year to apply for SSI/SSDI? No you should apply as soon as you become disabled if your condition is expected to last 1 year or more or it is expected to result in death...
    Important Fact 4
  • I missed the 60 day appeal deadline, do I have to start all over again? Not necessarily, if you can show that you had a good reason for missing your appeal deadline, such as being hospitalized...
    Important Fact 3
  • Do I have to wait 1 year to apply for SSI/SSDI? No you should apply as soon as you become disabled if your condition is expected to last 1 year or more or it is expected to result in death. ...
    Important Fact
  • What if I can't afford the medical care to get the medical documentation that I need for the social security administration? Usually there are other providers in the community that offer care at a reduced price or free...
    Important Fact

Deny Social Security?

APPEALS PROCESS

You can appeal most disability determinations and decisions social security administration makes about whether you can get supplemental security income (SSI) or if they make changes to your disability benefit amount. That means you can ask them to look at your disability case again.

When you ask for an appeal, the social security administration will look at the entire determination or decision, even those parts that were in your favor.

HOW TO APPEAL SOCIAL SECURITY DETERMINATIONS AND DECISIONS

Social Security has established appeals procedures for individuals who disagree with the determination(s) or decision(s) we make. The levels of appeal are:

Reconsideration (available in most States);

Administrative Law Judge Hearing;
Appeals Council Review;
Federal Court.

Social security calls the determinations they make that you can appeal “initial determinations.” These determinations include but are not limited to:

  • whether or not you are eligible;
  • the amount of your SSI payment; and
  • the fact that you were overpaid and the amount of the overpayment and whether you must repay it.

You must request an appeal in writing within 60 days of the date you receive your notice. The notice will tell you how to appeal. If you file an appeal within 10 days, your SSI disability benefits may continue at the same amount until the social security administration makes a determination on your appeal. The notice will tell you if you are entitled to continued disability benefits.

Appeal means you are asking the Social Security Administration to look at your case again.

Reconsideration: If you disagree with the initial decision, you have the right to appeal this decision to the next level, called the reconsideration level. You must ask for this appeal within 60 days from the date of the denial letter.

Hearing Level: If you are denied at the reconsideration level, then you appeal the decision to the hearing level where you have a formal hearing before an administrative law judge. Again you only have 60 days in which to file your appeal and request a hearing. The Administrative Law Judge may ask that you receive additional testing at the expense of the Social Security Administration. This hearing is recorded and you may obtain a copy of it. Sometime after the hearing, the Judge will send both you and your representative a copy of the opinion letter.